Felter Skelter

Felter Skelter - your essential needle felting column from Mr X Stitch!

Calling all fantasy lovers! This month I’ve gathered some of my favorite needle felt dragons. Seven felt artists bring these fantastic creatures to life in spectacular detail, each in their own unique style.  Make sure to click through to each artist’s website to see more of their needle felt creations!

Alice FeltsAlice Felts

Amanda Kae CreationsAmanda Kae Creations

Gaibubuldine(Miyazaki fans will recognize Haku, from Spirited Away)
Gaibubuldine


Reve MiniaturesReve Miniatures

TallydragonTallydragon

ShyshyruShyshyru

BLM Dolls N Stuff…and finally, a REAL dragon – a Leafy Seadragon!
BLM Dolls N Stuff

I hope you’ve enjoyed this installment of Felter Skelter. See you next time!

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xstitchersofinstagram, curated and shot by Mr X Stitch

God bless Lucy Sparrow, aka @sewyoursoul, making soft versions of everything. #regram
・・・
I don’t think I ever had a babysitter but if I did, they definitely didn’t look like this.
#unabletocomment #mrxstitch
Share your stitchy ‘grams with us – @mrxstitch #xstitchersofinstagram #mrxstitch

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Felter Skelter - your essential needle felting column from Mr X Stitch!

Paolo del Toro creates needle felt sculptures inspired by dreams, the occult, and folk/fairy tales. He came to needle felting from a background in woodworking and his mastery of that medium is clearly evident in his approach to wool. Regardless of material, his sculptures demonstrate a high level of refinement and a unique character. Read on for images and words from the artist himself!

Paolo del Toro

Paolo del Toro

“I’m British, but recently immigrated to Pennsylvania. Previous to moving here I spent most of my time living and working on farms around Europe. I was often tasked with working with natural materials like stone or wood, and found that these materials crept more and more into the work I was producing; first as the subjects of my illustrations and then as the material I was actually using.”

Paolo del Toro

Paolo del Toro

“Most of my sculpture work so far has been in wood, but this past winter I chanced upon needle felting and have found it to be one of my favourite mediums. I tend to be a bit fastidious about the finish of my wood projects and find it hard to know when to stop smoothing and polishing the surface. However, the surface of felt is fuzzy by nature so I’ve been enjoying taking a break from my obsessive finishing techniques.”

Paolo del Toro

“I also love how forgiving felt is in comparison to wood. Making a mistake in wood is tricky to put right, but much more achievable in felt. I also like how accessible the art form is. Needle felting doesn’t require any expensive tools or in-depth training, and it doesn’t create much in the way of mess or waste.”Paolo del Toro

 

You can find more of Paolo’s work at magichairball.blogspot.com

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Felter Skelter - your essential needle felting column from Mr X Stitch!

I am pleased to announce ORACLES, my upcoming solo exhibition at the Philadelphia Sculpture Gym’s PSG Gallery. I usually prefer to showcase other needle felt artists in this column, but this month I want to give you a peek at what I’ve been working on myself, and share a little about how it is made.

Zoë Williams needle felting mat Zoë Williams needle felting wool

These are the tools of the trade! My favorite needles and mat are both made by Clover. Pictured is the large needle felting mat and refill needles (heavy weight and fine weight). Also pictured: a “reverse” felting needle, which pulls the fibers outward instead of pushing them in. Of course there would be nothing to felt without some WOOL*! I get my wool from Paradise Fibers. I use a combination of Corriedale and Superfine Merino Top in most of my sculptures, but if you are new to needle felting, I recommend trying a variety of fibers to give you a feel for the medium. (*Actually, you can needle felt acrylic fiber too! I wrote about this for the Lion Brand blog HERE)

Zoë Williams Tohickon glass eye blanks Zoë Williams Tohickon painted eye blanks

I get a lot of inquiries about my eyes. I use glass taxidermy eyes in all of my pieces and I get almost all of them from Tohickon. For ORACLES, I painted many of the eyes myself, using clear eye blanks and enamel paint. They are painted on the back side, which is every bit as tricky as it sounds!

Zoë Williams needle felt work in progress IMG_4479

Here’s a look at one of my sculptures in the early stages (left) and then later on with some of the details roughed in (right). They look very blobby for a long time while the wool firms up, but it’s important not to rush. Needle felt need not be squishy! This is ultimately a matter of taste, but a solid foundation is critical for adding non-fiber elements like eyes, bird legs, antlers, etc.

Zoë Williams, Harbingers 2015

ORACLES opens Friday, June 5th with a reception from 6:00 – 9:00pm (Join the party on Facebook). If you would like to preview the show before it opens, please send an email to psggallery@gmail.com. As always, you may direct artwork inquiries, artist recommendations, and needle felting questions (or any questions about art, life in general, etc) directly to me! Happy felting!

Please note that this post contains affiliate links. If you purchase supplies from some of these links, I will get a small commission or rewards points

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