Cutting & Stitching Edge

Sayraphim Lothian is a “public artist and investigator of playful engagement & experiments in guerrilla kindness” from Melbourne, Australia. She has a new artist in residency project that is very interesting!

Sayraphim Lothian - Wreath

“It’s called Craffiti and it’s soft sculpture and other crafted works based on some of Melbourne’s amazing street art scene. The crafts range from knitting to cross stitch, hand quilting to soft sculpture and embroidery. Alongside each work is a photo of the original street art piece and most of the artists represented have works of their own in the exhibition as well.

Sayraphim Lothian - Tag
“I look at sewing as solving puzzles, how am I going to make this the shape I want, what craft will I use, what materials will give me the surface I’m looking for, and so using street art for the inspiration offered me a whole new set of challenges. Will I make this 3d or 2d? What kind of craft will suit the original work the best? And, in one case, how the hell am I going to make this guy stand on his own without wire or bring hung up?

Sayraphim Lothian - Figure

“Using other people’s artwork as a starting point for your own is also a great responsibility. With any work you make, you want to make it as best as you can, but when using someone else’s work as a template, you have an added responsibility to be true to their vision as well as your own. You don’t want to present a work they’re going to hate!

Sayraphim Lothian - Crowned Figure

I love the idea of artists in residence, those schemes that museums, historic houses, libraries and other institutions have where artists are invited in to soak up the collections, the buildings, the histories and the stories and emerge with new artworks based on their experiences. Artists can offer the public a new way to look at an item, a new way to think about a building, a new way to experience a history. Artists can take the familiar and re-present it in a new light, using different materials to encourage us to really look at something we thought we knew, and present to us new thoughts, ideas and experiences we haven’t had before.

Sayraphim Lothian - TentacledFigure

In a way, Craffiti is exactly this, an artist residency down the alleyways of Melbourne, bringing back ideas and forms found under eaves, on walls and fences, attached to poles and hidden under bridges. Remaking these forms in new materials to present them to the audience in a new light.

 

When I was first approaching the street artists, I was a little aware that craft can be seen as a bit daggy in the public eye and that some of these artists have been painting the streets for decades. In particular one artist who I have been in awe of since I discovered his work over 10 years ago, I was a bit nervous to email him and say “Umm, I’d like to quilt your tag please…” but they were all amazingly supportive and really keen to see their work in new ways.

Sayraphim Lothian - Octopus

 

“I’m a public artist, who’s main body of work is in Guerrilla Kindness. It’s where I made small, handcrafted works to place out in the streets for people to find and take home, to make their day a little brighter. So with Craffiti I really wanted to have a Guerrilla Kindness aspect to it, as well as take it out to the streets. I was very aware that I was bringing street art into a nice, clean gallery space so I wanted to ensure that some of Craffiti made it’s way back out onto the streets. So I knitted around 20 spray cans (which rattle, thanks to a film canister and wooden bead inside) and they’ve been sent off to friends around the world who’ll be dropping them in their cities. Already spray cans have gone out in Perth (AUS) and Durham, NC (USA), they’ll also be appearing on streets in London (courtesy of Deadly Knitshade), Berlin, New York, Boston, Stockholm, Brisbane (AUS) and of course Melbourne! Each can has “Craffiti” and “@sayraphim” so that people can check in if they’d like to, but they don’t have too. It’s an obligation free gift, from us to whoever finds them.

Sayraphim Lothian - Troll

Such a great idea and some excellent pieces of work. I want that troll so bad. Follow all of Sayraphim’s adventures on instagram, facebook, twitter and on her website.

{ 0 comments }

The Cutting & Stitching Edge | Contemporary Embroidered Art from Mr X Stitch

Kate Crossley is a textile artist from Oxford.

Kate Crossley - Chrysalis

“I love to use the medium that speaks to me at that moment and is best suited to the idea, I use paper, fabric, stitch, paint, dye, photo transfer, fibre etch, paper mache, resin and found objects. The piece may become a quilt, a wall hanging, a box or a book.

“Ideas of layering, wrapping and preserving are returning themes, I often build up layers of fabric and embroidery only to use acid on the surface to burn away parts to reveal detail underneath, a sort of artist’s archaeology.

Kate Crossley - Book at Bedtime

“I enjoy telling a story, of things that have gone before and of objects that have become precious and have a story to tell. Although my work often has a strong personal theme this is not always obvious; it is important to me that my work allows the viewer the space to invent and interpret the work for themselves.

“All of my work contains some elements of stitch and textile. I mainly use a Janome machine and a Juki machine for free machine embroidery and with my newest purchase, a New English Quilter which allows me to use my Juki more like a long arm quilter. I love to use free machine embroidery, especially for adding text, combined with patchwork and quilting. I often work in multiple layers, burning back the surface with devore paste to create exciting new fabrics and unusual, aged surfaces.

Kate Crossley - Box Of Delights

“I use various weights of calico cotton, muslins and scrim, lots of pure silk, especially dupion, alongside recycled fabric. For thread I use a pure silk and really love Texere’s brilliant selection. Most work starts off white or cream and I like to use walnut ink, Procion and natural dyes to colour recycled fabric. I also use different photo transfer methods. Bubble Jet Set is wonderful to use if you want to print directly onto fabric using an inkjet printer and Lesley Riley’s Transfer Artists Paper is lovely to use as you can draw and paint over images and distress the surface before you iron on to the fabric.

“I have also learnt simple mould-making and casting techniques as well as resin casting as sometimes I want multiple objects in a piece and this is the simplest way to reproduce a found object. Of course sometimes an object is simply too precious to use in a cabinet so a mould and cast allows me to go ahead and use it.

Kate Crossley - Clock

After making “Clock” and winning the Quilt Creation section at the Festival of Quilts this year I was asked if it could go on display this March at the American Museum in Bath alongside some of their wonderful old clocks and quilts. They have a wonderful collection of quilts on display and this year are hosting an exhibition Hatched, Matched, Dispatched – & Patched! An exhibition featuring quilts and garments associated with birth, marriage and death which looks amazing. I will also be running some workshops at the Museum the first is on May the 9th.

Kate Crossley - Clock (detail)

Kate is fearless in her exploration of the textile form. Her huge sculptures are created with an array of printing and embellishment techniques that are quite frankly, mind boggling.

Kate Crossley - Kate's Book Of Common Prayer

I discovered Kate’s work last year, and was blown away by the chrysalis piece in particular. Her art is packed with narrative and and you have to take time to fully explore her work. Whether it’s digital printing, resin work or soft sculpture, there are loads of techniques to be enjoyed. The fabric force is indeed strong in this one.

Kate Crossley - In The Beginning There Was Void

I love art like this, where you’re forced to take time out to properly engage with it. Visit Kate’s website to keep up with where you’ll be able to see the work for yourself.

—–

The Cutting (& Stitching) Edge is brought to you in association with PUSH: Stitchery, the contemporary embroidered art book curated by Jamie Chalmers. Featuring 30 textile-based artists from around the world, it’s a must have for needlework fans.

{ 0 comments }

The Cutting & Stitching Edge | Contemporary Embroidered Art from Mr X Stitch

Hannalie Taute is a mixed media artist from the Klein Karoo, South Africa. Her latest show “Cross My Heart” runs from 10 February – 30 March 2015 at Erdmann Contemporary in Cape Town.

Hannalie Taute - Sacrifice

“Taute’s work is in a constant state of evolution, which in itself mirrors many of the ideas behind her art. One central theme or unifying characteristic is the repeated exploration of identity.

Hannalie Taute - Fauna and Flora

“She explores this concept by means in which people often have many, and sometimes conflicting, identities to which they answer to. This is perhaps most striking in her upcoming show Cross My Heart, her 6th solo exhibition, where Taute again returns to the medium of recycled inner tires with embroidered thread.

Hannalie Taute - Pigs

“The coarseness of the rubber is counteracted by the delicacy of the thread, but this is subverted, as often the stitching and composition of the rubber tires are delicate and the thread seems almost rough in its arrangement. Taute manages to make the medium of the piece interact with the subject matter in a way that forces the viewer to deeply engage and question with the art-works.”

Hannalie Taute - Safe

I’m a sucker for stitching on interesting surfaces and so it’s no surprise that Hannalie’s work really excites me. I asked her a bit more about the process and Hannalie explained that although she’s only recently started using embroidery in her work, she’s getting into it.

“What I can say is that I enjoy the process of getting the rubber in such a state that I can start embroider on it, basically using one type of stitch, in order to practice ‘painting’ with the thread. I started to explore size in the work, and find different challenges to do the actual act of embroidery on that size.”

Hannalie Taute - No Hard Feelings

I love the hi contrast stitching and the punk aesthetic that arises from stitching on a fetishistic surface like rubber. There’s a rawness to the work and a brutality that is quite arresting. With strong characterisation and a dark sense of humour, it’s a great exhibition and I’m just sorry that I can’t make it to South Africa to see it.

Hannalie Taute - Cross My Heart

As part of the exhibition, you can enjoy this e-catalogue of the exhibition to get even more of this terrific work.


Visit Hannalie’s website to find out more about her remarkable work.

—–

The Cutting (& Stitching) Edge is brought to you in association with PUSH: Stitchery, the contemporary embroidered art book curated by Jamie Chalmers. Featuring 30 textile-based artists from around the world, it’s a must have for needlework fans.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The Cutting & Stitching Edge | Contemporary Embroidered Art from Mr X Stitch

 

Teresa Lim is an embroidery artist from Singapore.

Teresa Lim - Sew Wanderlust Prague - Hand Embroidery

Sew Wanderlust is Teresa’s ongoing pet project to document her travels. It started in 2014 in Perth when  she was at the beach and she wanted to take a photo of the sunset but her phone has ran out of battery. She only had her craft supplies with her and she thought that maybe it would be great to embroider the scene instead. That was how “Sew Wanderlust” started.

Teresa Lim - Sew Wanderlust Charles Bridge, Prague - Hand Embroidery

“In her own words, she says ‘Embroidering a place instead of taking a photo makes so much of a difference. When you take a photo of a place, you don’t notice the small details. But when you draw or embroider, your eye picks out so much more detail that you wont usually notice. And after I complete a piece, I feel like I actually KNOW the place.”

Teresa Lim - Sew Wanderlust Singapore - Hand Embroidery

What a nice idea. Teresa says it takes her a couple of hours to stitch each piece and I can’t help but imagine that it’s a couple of hours very well spent. I’ve stitched on holiday before, but never had the thought of stitching my surroundings. Now it seems like that’s the only sensible thing to do…

Teresa Lim - Sew Wanderlust London - Hand Embroidery

Teresa recently graduated from Lasalle College of the Arts in Singapore with a first class BA Hons degree in Fashion design and textiles and has already worked with big names like Swarovski, H&M and Harpers Bazaar. A visit to her website showcases the breadth of her work, which extends much further than Sew Wanderlust.

Teresa Lim - Sew Wanderlust Frankfurt - Hand Embroidery

However this was such a simple and elegant idea that it merited a post of its own. If you feel inspired to do something similar, be sure to contact us and tell us about it. Be also sure to visit Teresa’s website and enjoy an emerging talent as she grows and evolves.

—–

The Cutting (& Stitching) Edge is brought to you in association with PUSH: Stitchery, the contemporary embroidered art book curated by Jamie Chalmers. Featuring 30 textile-based artists from around the world, it’s a must have for needlework fans.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Mr X