Book Review – Bojagi

Bojagi

Mr X Stitch Book Review

Introduction

Bojagi – Sara Cook (Published by Batsford)

To be honest, our first question as a reader was:  What is it?  Well, its about to be explained via the author Sara Cook!

In short, it is a Textiles technique, a traditional one, which was born in Korea.  Thus is has depth and cultural roots.

Who is it aimed at?

This book has a specialist tone, made for those with a little more artistic interest than the average crafter.  Made for one who loves the Textile arts.

Maybe an experienced artist has tried many techniques and wants to cross countries to try out another cultural arts interest.  Maybe you are a quilter, an embroiderer, someone who just wants a fresh start and a new idea to incorporate or at least learn about?

About the artist

The publisher Batsford (Pavillion) tells us:

‘With a professional seamstress for a mother and an uncle who was a Savile Row tailor, Sara was never far from fabric and sewing advice as she grew up. As a qualified teacher and textile specialist with more than 25 years’ experience, Sara established Brighton Fashion and Textile School in 2012 to teach City & Guilds qualifications in textiles. A member of the Quilters Guild she qualified as a quilt judge in 2016 and has judged at local and international quilt shows.

Inspired by Chunghie Lee’s work, No Name Woman exhibited at the Festival of Quilts in 2009, Sara became passionate about researching Bojagi and incorporating it into her own working practice. Researching Korean textiles has inspired her to experiment with traditional narrow seams, creating irregular grids. Combined with her love of translucency and constructed textiles, her current body of work explores the effect of light on the landscape.

Now we come to learn about her favoured technique in this volume.

The publication of her book Bojagi: design and techniques in Korean textiles this year is the culmination of ten years of research into historic practitioners and artists today, those based in Korea and those practicing across the world.’

The Korean technique can now be shown throughout the world and appreciated through Cook’s text and enthusiasm for teaching the technique.  Let’s learn more about it…

See Also

Content

Here is a look at what’s on offer:

Bojagi contents list
Bojagi contents list

Everything is covered, from the cultural centre of this technique to the materials we will need to try it.

Sewing equipment is listed to use the ideas in this book
Sewing equipment visually shown to depict what it needed for the ideas in this book.

What makes it special?

We loved this pixel view of this ahem, well known person!
We loved this pixel view of this ahem, well known person!

The imagery within this book surprises, we thought it would all be traditional and not at all contemporary.  Yes we were wrong!  This book is more than a historical look at Korean textiles, it showcases a technique which has relevance now.

Photography

Large photographs of the technique are distributed throughout the publication.
Large photographs of the technique are distributed throughout the publication.
The chapters are obviously divided with pages simply stating the next sections title.
The chapters are obviously divided with pages simply stating the next sections title and a good strong image.

Is there anything wrong with the book?

The issue may surround the subject matter.  If you are just starting out your learning in the Textiles field and need something a little more basic to hold your interest, then this may not be the one for you just yet.

Conclusion

Bojagi – Sara Cook (Published by Batsford)

So if you fancy a new idea or want to research a different style of work, give this one a go.

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