Come behind the scenes at Kreinik


Come along with me, behind the scenes at the Kreinik thread factory, via this month’s post. Recently, I drove over the mountains, through the woods, by the river, and into a rainbow (literally) to visit the Parkersburg, West Virginia, renovated-church-building where Kreinik makes threads. (Cue: “Hallelujah!”) It was glorious. Music was playing, people were friendly, threads and brilliant colors were everywhere. Here are a few snapshots from behind the scenes at Kreinik.

The factory is divided into the silk thread section, and the metallic thread section (shown here). Threads are made, coned, spools, labeled, and packaged in a gigantic room of color and music (could not help but tap my foot to some good classic rock playing in the room).
The factory is divided into the silk thread section and the metallic thread section (shown here). Threads are made, coned, spooled, labeled, and packaged in a gigantic room of color and music (could not help but tap my foot to some good classic rock playing in the room).
Kreinik metallic threads aren't stranded floss skeins like others; they are tightly braided filaments used straight off the reel. The machines that braid them are behind this door. It's beautifully noisy; you just know gorgeous colors and fibers are being made. Some of the machines are over 100 years old, refurbished and digitized for modern day manufacturing.
Kreinik metallic threads aren’t stranded floss skeins like others; they are tightly braided filaments used straight off the reel. The machines that braid them are behind this door. It’s beautifully noisy; you just know gorgeous colors and fibers are being made. Some of the machines are over 100 years old, refurbished and digitized for modern day manufacturing.
Once the thread (braids) are made, they are put on cones and organized by size, then color. From here, they will be put on small spools which are sold to stores and kitmakers.
Once the thread (braids and ribbons) are made, they are put on cones and organized by size, then color. From here, they will be put on small spools which are sold to stores and kitmakers.
Once Kreinik threads are spooled and labeled, they are pulled for orders. Not sure which shop was getting this group, but I imagine opening the package will be akin to Christmas morning.
Once Kreinik threads are spooled and labeled, they are pulled for orders. Not sure which shop was getting this group, but I imagine opening the package will feel like Christmas morning.
Some labels are put on the spools by hand. I'm glad they didn't ask me to do this part, I think I would be too slow (although the music in the background helps!).
Some labels are put on the spools by hand. I’m glad they didn’t ask me to do this part, I think I would be too slow (although the music in the background helps!).
I spent some time in the metallic thread room taking product photos. Had fun hanging out with the ladies working on someone's Kreinik order. The people who work at Kreinik are so nice, friendly, and dedicated.
I spent some time in the metallic thread room taking product photos. Had fun hanging out with the ladies working on someone’s Kreinik order. The people who work at Kreinik are so nice, friendly, and dedicated.
After a day's work, the area was pretty quiet. Wouldn't be long, though before the braiding, coning, spooling, labeling, and packaging would begin. Imagine the sounds of thread being made for you.
After a day’s work, the area was pretty quiet. Wouldn’t be long though before the braiding, coning, spooling, labeling, and packaging would begin again. Imagine the sounds of thread being made for you and your next creation.
This is really behind-the-scenes at Kreinik: corner of the room where empty cones are kept, ready to be filled with colorful threads.
This is really behind-the-scenes at Kreinik: corner of the room where empty cones are kept, ready to be filled with colorful threads.
All smiles during and after my visit to the Kreinik thread factory. While Doug Kreinik gives unofficial tours periodically, the factory outlet store is open during regular business hours. If you have a chance to visit, go! It's 1708 Gihon Road, Parkersburg, West Virginia, USA.
All smiles during and after my visit to the Kreinik thread factory. While Doug Kreinik gives unofficial tours periodically, the factory outlet store is open during regular business hours. If you have a chance to visit, go! It’s 1708 Gihon Road, Parkersburg, West Virginia, USA.
Part of the reason I visited the factory was to take photos for Kreinik's website. Look for lots of new things coming to www.kreinik.com shortly (as soon as I get the pics ready!).
Part of the reason I visited the factory was to take photos for Kreinik’s website. Look for lots of new things coming to www.kreinik.com shortly (as soon as I get the pics ready!).

This is just a tiny peek behind the scenes where Doug Kreinik and staff make the threads we love to use in our needlework. There is an outlet store near the front of the factory open during business hours; if you ever have the chance, stop by. The Kreinik thread factory is located at 1708 Gihon Road in Parkersburg, West Virginia—yes, “almost heaven!”

 


KreinikGirl
Dena Lenham, aka KreinikGirl, is Creative Director at Kreinik Manufacturing Company, a family-owned, USA-based business that manufactures high-quality yarns and threads made of metallics, silks and real metals from their West Virginia factory. Dena’s monthly column, Kreinik Calling, sheds light on the fascinating fibres that we all use and love.
KreinikGirl

@kreinikgirl

Official thread news, tips, ideas and answers from Dena Lenham, Creative Director at thread company Kreinik Mfg. Co., Inc.
Due to demand, we have added a second time to our December ornament making class. Details here:… https://t.co/mdGke5B5N1 - 7 hours ago
KreinikGirl
KreinikGirl