String Art – The Next Generation is Shiny


It began in the late 1800s, peaked during the 1960s and 1970s, and found a resurgence in the 2010s. That’s a nice run for a math lesson involving thread. I’m talking about string art: arranging threads between various points to create geometric patterns, shapes, and designs.

Today, many of us don’t even like math, er, I mean, many of us make string art for the patterns and colors rather than for the geometry. I dabbled in it during my Girl Scout years, then started pinning and following string art Instagrams last year when the home decor magazines brought it back in style. I didn’t really pick it up again, however, until Doug Kreinik showed me his latest creation: metallic thread string art. This was different from any string art I’d seen, and not because of new patterns and designs. It was the thread that made it unique: it was shiny thread not plain yarn. Doug started showing his metallic string art models to designer friends, and they all had the same reaction, “Wow.”

Christmas Tree string art created with Kreinik metallic threads (specifically, Medium #16 Braid).
Christmas Tree string art created with Kreinik metallic threads (Medium #16 Braid and Heavy #32 Braid, www.kreinik.com).

Since then, I’ve spent many evenings stringing my metallic heart away. Metallic thread string art is more vibrant than yarn string art, but not garish. It marries child-like colored lines with a grown-up finish. It somehow encapsulates rudimentary form and modern tech. It’s geeky, retro, yet current. It’s so eye-catching, it surprises you. Can you tell I’m a convert? It slices, it dices, does your taxes and calls your mother. Well, not really, but you get the idea: it’s something fun and different. You are going to have to try it, trust me. It’s one of the freshest trends in thread that I’ve seen in a long time.

Designs from the Monogram and Nature String Art On Canvas kits by Kreinik.
Designs from the Monogram and Nature String Art On Canvas kits by Kreinik using metallic and glow-in-the-dark threads.

Kreinik (the thread company out of Parkersburg, West Virginia) developed a line of String Art On Canvas kits as a result of the growing interest in metallic thread string art. Instead of needing hammer, nails, and wood, not-to-mention carrying that around as a cumbersome embroidery project, these kits are compact and portable. This is free-form embroidery with metallic threads on a gauze-like canvas. The gauze gives stability to the design, plus makes it like a patch that you can attach to any surface.

Designs from three different string art kits from Kreinik Manufacturing Company, using metallic and glow-in-the-dark threads.
Designs from three different string art kits from Kreinik Manufacturing Company, using metallic and glow-in-the-dark threads. The string art is created on a gauze-like canvas, cut out, and attached to surfaces using double-sided tape.

The kits include everything you need to make one design, including outlines, canvas, needle, thread and reusable embroidery hoop. There are no rules, no limits, just color in the outline. I can stitch one in about two hours if I’m really engrossed in the game/show/movie I’m watching. The Kreinik kits include glow-in-the-dark threads, which adds another layer of fun to the project.

Glow-in-the-dark threads add a fun dimension to string art.
Glow-in-the-dark threads add another level to string art creations. This bat design is from the new Halloween set in the Kreinik String Art On Canvas kit series.

I demonstrated metallic thread string art at the Pittsburgh Creative Arts Festival last month. Kids and teens LOVED it. I mean, couldn’t stop doing them, begged their parents for them. For some it was the first time they’d held a needle and thread. I’d say two out of five adults had trouble with the “free form” concept (“No charts to follow? I don’t know if I can do that?”), and one parent even told their child, “You’re doing it wrong” (yikes, poor child, and there’s no way to do string art incorrectly). Once they tried it, they embraced the freedom. Funny, how hard it is to let creativity loose once we “grow up.”

Sample from the Kreinik String Art On Canvas kits. Trace an outline onto the canvas, then make random stitches with metallic threads.
Sample from the Kreinik String Art On Canvas kits. Trace an outline onto the canvas, then make random stitches with metallic threads. The gauze provides a stabilizing background for the stitches but also creates the sense of a “floating” design.

Your mission is to explore the exciting world of metallic thread string art: to seek out free-form creativity with random stitches, to boldly stitch on something you may not have tried before. You can go here for more information on Kreinik’s starter kits. Stitch long and prosper.

P.S. It’s so much fun to be on this stitch-and-embroidery voyage together. Happy 6th birthday www.mrxstitch.com.


KreinikGirl
Dena Lenham, aka KreinikGirl, is Creative Director at Kreinik Manufacturing Company, a family-owned, USA-based business that manufactures high-quality yarns and threads made of metallics, silks and real metals from their West Virginia factory. Dena’s monthly column, Kreinik Calling, sheds light on the fascinating fibres that we all use and love.
KreinikGirl

@kreinikgirl

Official thread news, tips, ideas and answers from Dena Lenham, Creative Director at thread company Kreinik Mfg. Co., Inc.
Come to the Kreinik factory in Parkersburg and take a fun ornament making class Dec 1, 2018. Cost is $10.00. Sign u… https://t.co/a4WrbA3TU7 - 2 hours ago
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